Candidates for the Moraga Orinda Fire District Give Their Views

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By DAVID DIERKS

Assistant Editor

The Moraga-Orinda Fire District has a five-member board of directors representing five divisions. Charged with providing strategic leadership, policy and direction and fiscal oversight, the directors are elected to a four-year term and represent a specific division.

Division 1 has Nathan W. Bell and Gregory J. Baitx vying for one position with the Division 2 representative not up for re-election. Since Division 1 is only voted on by Moraga residents, we did not include those candidates in this article.  In Division 3, which comprises parts of Moraga and Orinda, there are three candidates for the one position: incumbent Stephen L. Anderson; retired fire administrator Steven Michael Danziger; and technology executive Robert “Red” Smith. In Division 4, retired Oakland firefighter Michael Donner and community volunteer Lucy Talbot will vie for the one position available.
The candidates were asked the following questions:
1. What motivated you to run for a MOFD board seat and what expertise will you bring to the board? 
2. What prior community volunteer and/or board of directors experience will you bring to the board?
3. How will you guide MOFD to prevent a wildfire from occurring in Orinda/Moraga?
4. What lessons can be learned from the recent major California wildfires and how do you envision MOFD preparing for similar fires in Orinda/Moraga?
5. Whether or not Orinda taxpayers pay more than their fair share of MOFD’s expenses has been a hot topic for many years as well as unfunded pension liabilities. How would you address these financial concerns?

Lucy Talbot

Why Running/Expertise

I am running for MOFD as an independent candidate who wants to represent the community’s needs and not to serve any special interest group. As an owner of a small business, incoming board president of a community-based philanthropy and a concerned citizen, I will leverage my experience to serve the public’s best interests. I’ll utilize my background in financial management to develop solutions to stabilize the unfunded pension and benefit liabilities and work to create a budget for critical prevention programs necessary to keep our community safe. MOFD currently has no budget for prevention and in a community of severe fire danger, we must have comprehensive programs to aid our citizens in creating a fire safe environment. I am experienced working with organizations in the public sector and will leverage my 15 years with Motorola providing emergency communications to fire and police
districts.

Community Involvement

Over the past 30 years, I have served on the parent boards of Glorietta, Wagner Ranch, OIS, Miramonte Schools as well as the Board of the Educational Foundation of Orinda (EFO). I am currently president elect of the Children’s Hospital Branches board, a 501C3 fundraising organization that raises funds for UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, Oakland. Throughout my life, I have placed a high priority in giving back to my community, and I look forward to serving on the MOFD Board where I can use my unbiased and critical thinking as well as business and communication skills to help stabilize and sustain the operations of this organization whose services are so essential to our community.

Preventing Wildfires

In a word prevention.   Many of us live in Orinda, in part, for its lush vegetation and rolling hills. Much of our beautiful Orinda is a Wildland Urban Interface and Severe Fire Hazard Zone.  Thus, fire danger is a serious reality. MOFD currently has no budget for prevention. Our community deserves to have comprehensive programs to aid our citizens in creating a fire safe environment.  I am committed to focusing on prevention programs, funded by MOFD’s budget and utilizing best practices of Bay Area communities that mirror our own high fire danger profile. The program must be a partnership of our community and MOFD with funding to aid residents with effective fuel mitigation, education on fire safe landscape plants and neighborhood fire safety programs.  Through the use of detailed satellite and drone mapping, we can identify “hot spots” with a goal to target and minimize combustible material. As a board member and representative of the community, I will work with the district to insure these activities take place. In the critical identified hot spot areas where fires could escalate quickly, in addition to the timely weed abatement notifications to residents, MOFD needs to communicate and actively manage house by house plans to reduce fuel loads. Independent studies of the Sleepy Hollow neighborhood identified critical roads that could be closed by hot spots which underscore this priority. Abatement involves minimizing certain highly flammable species, trimming up low branches and eliminating underbrush. I will seek to identify potential government grants available to perform the analysis and begin abatement, including in the 50 percent of our district outside the city limits of Orinda and Moraga.

Lessons from Recent Fires

We know prevention works.  The most valuable lesson learned is that once the fire starts, it is too late for preparation! Prevention and preparedness are the key elements to having an opportunity to control the outcome of a fire. An example of a community that proactively prepared for fire and was spared during the Atlas fire in Napa County was the Circle Oaks development. A number of years ago, the development’s HOA adopted the National Firewise USA program, a best practices fire safety program developed and available to anyone wishing to utilize their research and adopt their recommendations. MOFD needs to create a “Path to Prevention” to move toward such a fire safe environment for Orinda. I envision adopting the firewise program and then holding regular fire awareness and emergency preparedness seminars for our community, providing information for individuals and neighborhoods to use in developing neighborhood fire prevention and preparedness plans. We also need significant resources from the MOFD budget to fund these prevention efforts.  Eighty-five to 90 percent of MOFD’s budget goes to salaries and benefits with the focus solely on suppression after the fire starts. We need to allocate significant funding and personnel resources to prevention and fuel reduction.

Financial Concerns

Unfunded pension and medical benefit liabilities are currently over $70M for MOFD.  To ensure MOFD’s ability to maintain its quality of service we must make sure we have the resources and reserves to fund these obligations in the event of another economic downturn.  During the last downturn MOFD was required to cut staff and reduce pay. We must be disciplined during these good times and put significant money aside for these huge obligations and work to minimize their growth in the future. On the fairness question, I concur with past board members that if this issue is unresolved in the eyes of a number of taxpayers, it deserves to be addressed. I believe it is important for a public entity to listen to the issues and ideas of the community and present any analysis of these issues in an open forum. It is my understanding that the community was never given a public document disclosure by the Orinda City Council, any Committee or LAFCO that provided a quantified analysis of the breakdown of current and anticipated capital expenditures and operating expense allocation. Until this question is addressed, there will always be doubt in some taxpayer’s minds about fair expense allocation.

Michael Donner

Why Running/Expertise

After witnessing the devastation from recent wildland fires in the North Bay, I realized how my 31-year career with the Oakland Fire Department and my volunteer experience in emergency preparedness could be valuable to our community.  I have a deep understanding of the fire service based on the wide variety of calls I have responded to, including major incidents such as the Loma Prieta earthquake with the collapse of the Cypress structure and the Oakland Hills Firestorm.  Emergency preparedness is a topic that I am very passionate about. I served on the Orinda Union School District’s emergency preparedness committee for six years. I have helped present to the communities of both Moraga and Orinda on how to prepare for disaster.  My experience in the fire service, my passion for emergency preparedness and my involvement with the community made the decision to run for the MOFD board an easy one.

Community Involvement

My volunteer experience is vast and diverse, which has been a part of my entire adult life.  I have served as a board member for 14 years for Random Acts, a volunteer organization comprised of Oakland firefighters.  More recently, I am excited to have been participating with the Oakland Firefighters Cancer Prevention Foundation. I served on the emergency preparedness committee for six years with the Orinda Union School District.  I implemented an emergency cache at Glorietta Elementary and Orinda Intermediate schools. Both schools have containers filled with food, water and first aid supplies in case of a disaster. I have coached dozens of local sports teams.  I have volunteered with Seniors Around Town. I feel that my volunteer experience with Random Acts, Oakland Firefighters Cancer Prevention, the Orinda Union School District and local sports teams will be of great value to the MOFD board and our community.  

Preventing Wildfires

The recent Buckingham fire earlier this summer in Moraga was a reminder of the fire threat to our District.  The MOFD fire prevention staff is currently limited based on budget and staffing constraints. There is currently a fire marshal, a part-time fire inspector and three part-time district aides.  The National Fire Protection Agency recommends a minimum of five full-time fire prevention personnel for a fire district the size of MOFD. Unfortunately, budget cuts have made the prevention program difficult to manage without the proper funding and staffing. I would recommend an increase in fire prevention staffing and an increase to the fire prevention budget.  
I would like to see an emphasis on prevention programs such as defensible space, weed abatement, notification and strategic evacuation plans while collaborating with Public Works, Orinda Police, EBMUD and PG&E.  I am excited about the new hot spot mapping program, which is the Fire Chief’s recent pilot program.
Even with the best fire prevention program in the world, wildfire will occur. In addition to enhancing the fire prevention programs, I would like to restore our staffing level back to 19 line personnel as it was prior to early 2013.  Due to terrain and difficult access in our community, I would recommend two small 4-wheel drive fire engines, which are the size of a large pickup truck, commonly known as type 6 engines in the fire service. I would like our community to be resilient now and prepare for the worst by considering enhanced fire prevention, restored staffing and appropriate equipment for a quick a response.  

Lessons from Recent Fires

The recent fires throughout California have proved that preparation and planning for fire is critical.  Educating our community on how to prepare for wildfire is a subject I feel strongly about. I would like every household in our fire district to have reverse 9-1-1 on landlines and cell phones.  Early notification using reverse 9-1-1 can be used to isolate specific neighborhoods that may need additional time to evacuate, which can be followed up with notification to areas that have a less restricted egress.  This process allows for evacuation in an orderly manner.
I would like to educate our community on how to maneuver garage doors during power outages. There were several fire fatalities in the Atlas and Tubbs fires in the North Bay less than a year ago.  Many of those fatalities occurred in their garages.
The Moraga-Orinda firefighters have prepared for major wildfire in our area in many ways.  During the spring and summer, they perform progressive hose lays, review structure protection procedures and do off-road driver training.  Additionally, they have gained valuable experience by going out on strike teams to major fires around the state. Preparation for a major wildfire is a part of their daily work.
Wildfires require a quick response from trained personnel.  This is another example of why we need to restore staffing to 2013 levels.  The fire climate in California has changed dramatically since staffing was cut.  Public safety is my number one priority and I feel the community deserves this service restored.

Financial Concerns

All homeowners pay a property tax.  The distribution of County assessed taxes is not the responsibility of the MOFD Board of Directors. MOFD follows the Government Accounting Standards Board and Government Finance Officers Association guidelines and recommendations to provide accountability and transparency in the accounting of district finances.
Unfunded liabilities associated with pension and Other Post-Employment Benefits (OPEB) are assumptions.  Those assumptions change based on investment returns, actuarial, and expected revenue. Unfunded liabilities are defined as an employer funding pension obligations for staff out of current revenue (pay as you go), rather than a separate fund with advanced contributions.
In 2013, the California Public Employees’ Pension Reform Act took effect, which prohibited medical benefits in retirement and dramatically lowered OPEB liabilities.  MOFD is aggressively funding separate reserve funds to augment CCCERA contributions (pension liability) and retiree medical benefits (OPEB), which is no longer offered to new employees as of 2013.  Additionally, MOFD medical contributions have changed from a percentage rate to a flat number, which reduced OPEB further. The MOFD Board of Directors have made great advances in lowering their liabilities.  In 2022, the pension stabilization bond will be paid off and MOFD will have more funds available. I feel that operating under a less aggressive funding strategy, while increasing the level of service, is not irresponsible.

Red Smith

Why Running/Expertise

After living in both Moraga and Orinda for 30 years, coaching youth baseball for 20 years, and volunteering in many other ways; I wanted to elevate my contributions through public service as an independent candidate singularly dedicated to serving the community.
During the recent fire emergencies in other cities, I was struck that we have the same vulnerabilities in Moraga and Orinda. As a board member, I will help assess and balance the complex needs of our residents, our fire district personnel, and our annual budget to provide the best services possible in a financially prudent manner.
My 35-year management career started with Pacific Bell, and I have since spent over two decades as a technology executive in the Silicon Valley. Those big and small company experiences enable me to provide sound financial and technology insights and guidance to the MOFD chief and board.

Community Involvement

While I had the privilege of volunteering as a youth baseball coach for 20 years (from T-Ball through the High School Freshmen Team), I was also an active volunteer with Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, CAPA Dance, the Moraga Rotary Club, Campolindo High School, and as a guest lecturer at the Haas Business School, St. Mary’s College and Chico State University. I also just finished my 30th season of summer softball in Orinda.
I have served on the board of directors at St. Perpetua School, as a parent advisor and treasurer at Campolindo, and on the board of directors for multiple private companies. Those experiences allow me to hit the ground running if elected to the MOFD board; specifically, the ability to team with the four other directors and the fire chief to allocate taxpayer dollars in a financially prudent manner to ensure the community remains safe and secure.

Preventing Wildfires

While there are many approaches for preventing wildfires in Orinda/Moraga, I will focus on three particular activities as part of the board team: (1) fire prevention; (2) introduction of innovative technologies; and (3) aggressively applying for state and federal grant moneys which may be more readily available now after recent California catastrophes.
First, MOFD must put more resources toward fire prevention as budget allocations in the past have been almost non-existent. The current operating budget includes a full time fire marshall and approximately $58,000 in annual expenses. That’s not enough for a community surrounded by open space with 12,000 homes and over 30,000 residents.
Second, there are a variety of existing and emerging early warning innovations available for fire districts which can be implemented in Orinda/Moraga with more aggressive budget allocations in this area. I am particularly excited to assist the board in evaluating these early warning systems as I have spent most of my career assessing and implementing new technologies that deliver operational and environmental benefits.
Third, there is an ever growing statewide and national recognition that California’s potential for devastating wildfires can be mitigated with more attention to prevention. Regrettably, there are only so many local taxpayer dollars available annually to battle prevention head on, and that is why the district must be more aggressive in applying for grants and other financial assistance. In my professional career, I have employed resources in Washington, DC and at the state level to apply for public sector assistance across a wide variety of topics, and this experience will allow me to contribute on the MOFD Board in justifying subsidies for fire prevention beyond property taxes from local residents.

Lessons from Recent Fires

The most poignant lesson of the recent California wildfires is fire districts must be dedicated to funding a robust prevention plan and to rigorously and steadfastly implementing it over many years. It is not a single year, one and done kind of task as it takes all of our residents, coordinated by our extremely qualified fire district personnel, and supported by our City and Town organizations to make meaningful year over year progress.
Prevention involves fire breaks, brush removal, making houses and landscaping fire resistant, and a long list of relatively simple but important prevention techniques. We live alongside and among huge forests and open space. These preventative measures must be applied uniformly to gain the full benefit for our entire community. There are both national and local programs being successfully employed to manage fire risks through robust and aggressive prevention programs. Marin County has “FIREsafe Marin” whose goal is to be “dedicated to reducing wildfire hazards and improving fire safety awareness in our community.” This seems like a perfect goal for Orinda and Moraga. It does take money, focus, dedication, and community support, and I am proud to be running as an independent candidate and experienced business professional to be part of the team leading this future effort.

Financial Concerns

On the topic of unfunded pension liabilities, which is where the board’s ultimate charter is to represent and protect local residents and taxpayers, I am committed to balancing the needs for effective and efficient emergency services with the requirement to fund the current and retirement salaries and health benefits for district personnel. Currently, our MOFD pensions have been grossly underfunded for over a decade and conservative estimates now put the liability at $70,000,000 (although some estimate the balance is higher depending on the discount rate used in the calculations). Either way, this situation is completely unacceptable for taxpayers as it represents up to $8,000 per household which is not a check any resident is prepared to write. It will be my job as part of the five person board to begin making financially prudent decisions to ensure that our emergency service heroes have the money in their pension fund accounts to retire with the benefits promised. Regarding the “fair share” question on the allocation of costs between Orinda and Moraga, I am currently researching this issue and diving deeper into the history and quantification of this tensely debated topic.

Red Smith

Why Running/Expertise

After living in both Moraga and Orinda for 30 years, coaching youth baseball for 20 years, and volunteering in many other ways; I wanted to elevate my contributions through public service as an independent candidate singularly dedicated to serving the community.
During the recent fire emergencies in other cities, I was struck that we have the same vulnerabilities in Moraga and Orinda. As a board member, I will help assess and balance the complex needs of our residents, our fire district personnel, and our annual budget to provide the best services possible in a financially prudent manner.
My 35-year management career started with Pacific Bell, and I have since spent over two decades as a technology executive in the Silicon Valley. Those big and small company experiences enable me to provide sound financial and technology insights and guidance to the MOFD chief and board.

Community Involvement

While I had the privilege of volunteering as a youth baseball coach for 20 years (from T-Ball through the High School Freshmen Team), I was also an active volunteer with Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, CAPA Dance, the Moraga Rotary Club, Campolindo High School, and as a guest lecturer at the Haas Business School, St. Mary’s College and Chico State University. I also just finished my 30th season of summer softball in Orinda.
I have served on the board of directors at St. Perpetua School, as a parent advisor and treasurer at Campolindo, and on the board of directors for multiple private companies. Those experiences allow me to hit the ground running if elected to the MOFD board; specifically, the ability to team with the four other directors and the fire chief to allocate taxpayer dollars in a financially prudent manner to ensure the community remains safe and secure.

Preventing Wildfires

While there are many approaches for preventing wildfires in Orinda/Moraga, I will focus on three particular activities as part of the board team: (1) fire prevention; (2) introduction of innovative technologies; and (3) aggressively applying for state and federal grant moneys which may be more readily available now after recent California catastrophes.
First, MOFD must put more resources toward fire prevention as budget allocations in the past have been almost non-existent. The current operating budget includes a full time fire marshall and approximately $58,000 in annual expenses. That’s not enough for a community surrounded by open space with 12,000 homes and over 30,000 residents.
Second, there are a variety of existing and emerging early warning innovations available for fire districts which can be implemented in Orinda/Moraga with more aggressive budget allocations in this area. I am particularly excited to assist the board in evaluating these early warning systems as I have spent most of my career assessing and implementing new technologies that deliver operational and environmental benefits.
Third, there is an ever growing statewide and national recognition that California’s potential for devastating wildfires can be mitigated with more attention to prevention. Regrettably, there are only so many local taxpayer dollars available annually to battle prevention head on, and that is why the district must be more aggressive in applying for grants and other financial assistance. In my professional career, I have employed resources in Washington, DC and at the state level to apply for public sector assistance across a wide variety of topics, and this experience will allow me to contribute on the MOFD Board in justifying subsidies for fire prevention beyond property taxes from local residents.

Lessons from Recent Fires

The most poignant lesson of the recent California wildfires is fire districts must be dedicated to funding a robust prevention plan and to rigorously and steadfastly implementing it over many years. It is not a single year, one and done kind of task as it takes all of our residents, coordinated by our extremely qualified fire district personnel, and supported by our City and Town organizations to make meaningful year over year progress.
Prevention involves fire breaks, brush removal, making houses and landscaping fire resistant, and a long list of relatively simple but important prevention techniques. We live alongside and among huge forests and open space. These preventative measures must be applied uniformly to gain the full benefit for our entire community. There are both national and local programs being successfully employed to manage fire risks through robust and aggressive prevention programs. Marin County has “FIREsafe Marin” whose goal is to be “dedicated to reducing wildfire hazards and improving fire safety awareness in our community.” This seems like a perfect goal for Orinda and Moraga. It does take money, focus, dedication, and community support, and I am proud to be running as an independent candidate and experienced business professional to be part of the team leading this future effort.

Financial Concerns

On the topic of unfunded pension liabilities, which is where the board’s ultimate charter is to represent and protect local residents and taxpayers, I am committed to balancing the needs for effective and efficient emergency services with the requirement to fund the current and retirement salaries and health benefits for district personnel. Currently, our MOFD pensions have been grossly underfunded for over a decade and conservative estimates now put the liability at $70,000,000 (although some estimate the balance is higher depending on the discount rate used in the calculations). Either way, this situation is completely unacceptable for taxpayers as it represents up to $8,000 per household which is not a check any resident is prepared to write. It will be my job as part of the five person board to begin making financially prudent decisions to ensure that our emergency service heroes have the money in their pension fund accounts to retire with the benefits promised. Regarding the “fair share” question on the allocation of costs between Orinda and Moraga, I am currently researching this issue and diving deeper into the history and quantification of this tensely debated topic.

Steven Danziger

Why Running/Expertise

I was motivated to run because there is a need for change on the board and I have the experience, knowledge and desire to help improve MOFD. No board member had experience in the fire service.  Their inexperience led to decisions that resulted in delays in construction of Station 43, which is now 1.5 years behind schedule and conservatively 1.5 million over budget. Tens of thousands was wasted on projects to buy an office building and construct a firehouse with Contra Costa Fire.
I have three-plus decades of governmental experience including 20 years as an administrative manager with Oakland Fire.  I also worked in the Oakland Finance and City Manager’s Office. I have a Master’s in Public Administration. l bring a unique perspective to the Board-someone who has fire service and governmental experience. I believe that my skill set will be an asset to the District and will result in a safer Moraga, Orinda and Canyon.

Community Involvement

I have a passion for public service and a desire to make a difference. During the 23 years I have lived in Orinda, I have been scoutmaster of Troop 57, den leader for Pack 52, an OBA & OYA coach, and a swim club VP. While my boys were going to school I regularly volunteered at the schools and on field trips. I am presently an Orinda Parks and Rec Commissioner, member of the Art in Public Places Committee and a UC Master Gardener. On most first Sunday’s, you can find me at the Moraga Farmer’s Market talking about  plants. I am a member of Friends of the Library and Friends of Wagner Ranch Nature Area. I previously was a Hayward Commissioner, and I am extremely proud of the 69 blood donations I have provided to the American Red Cross to help save a life.

Preventing Wildfires

Chief Winnacker and Fire Marshal Leonard have been extremely pro active this season in efforts to abate weeds and over grown vegetation. I will support their efforts to ensure our community is as fire safe as possible.  As a board member, I will be vigilant in finding ways to have a more robust fire prevention program. Some of the ways I envision of accomplishing this include: continue to support the chief’s pilot program-The Emergency Outdoor Warning System; increasing the number of part-time fire aides; restoring the Fire Reserve Program, working with neighborhoods and elected officials to provide common sense defensible space guidelines for homes; looking at the possibility of increased parking restrictions on narrow/winding streets, emphasize the importance in CERT to help prepare residents for responding to emergencies, promote the “Fire Safe Program;” increase an awareness campaign to educate the public on fire prone landscaping plants and the use of more fire-resistant native plants, support increased wildland training opportunities for firefighters; and conducting a thorough review of equipment and apparatus used in fire fighting.   
As director, I intend to discuss hazard mitigation and apply as much influence as possible on large property owners like PG&E, EBMUD, EBRPG and private owners to adequately manage their properties. I will work with other elected officials to hold them accountable for maintaining properties and taking responsibility in case of fire.
Some of these programs will take funding, and there are presently limited financial resources available. The board will have to work with the chief to prioritize any new programs and try to identify funding sources. Grants, private donations and special State funds may be options.  A result of the recent Northern California fires may be that new legislation provides funding for local community fire prevention programs.

Lessons from Recent Fires

In many ways, our community is similar to the areas affected by the recent wildfires, and the district has already begun to look at the lessons learned from those incidents. Data is still being analyzed but some general findings have been identified. The major areas that MOFD needs to concentrate on include: better public awareness of evacuation routes, families should be better prepared and have a plan of escape, communication tools like Nixel, reverse 911 & Pulse Point are under utilized, citizens need more encouragement to enroll in CERT, and homeowners need more education on fire prevention and safety.
As far as MOFD preparing for similar fires, I envision that the district will maintain and enhance many of the programs already in operation, particularly in the area of fire prevention. Reduction of vegetation through control burns and training burns, reviewing the types of apparatus available to ensure it is the most effective, and continuing to build cooperative working relationships with Cal Fire, EBRPD, Oakland Fire, Contra Costa Fire, local police agencies and other public agencies is extremely important. The relationships I developed over 20 years with the Oakland Fire Department can only be helpful in these matters.
Finally, in order to adequately prepare for fires in our community, the board needs to explore all means possible to restore service levels to pre-recession levels.  Immediately, that would mean hiring two firefighter paramedics to staff the ambulance at Station 45 in downtown Orinda. When these cuts were made, the board promised they would be restored when the economy recovered; to date this has not occurred. The population in the district is older than most communities and the majority of calls are medical. Staffing an ambulance will mean better fire protection since an entire crew will not need to respond to medical calls and can be available for fires or other non-medical emergencies.
Not all these measures involve funds. Some can be implemented, staffed and developed using available resources. With my extensive experience and knowledge of fire service and public sector, I am ready for the challenge of making the district safer.

Financial Concerns

The question of equity has been addressed since 2011.  Subcommittee representatives concluded Orinda does not unfairly pay more than Moraga.  A report of June 15, 2016, “Analysis of Funding Equity Between Taxpayers of Orinda and Moraga,” had the same conclusion.  I believe this is no longer a board
issue.
Unfunded pension liability is not specific to MOFD. It effects pension obligations nationwide. The problem: current assets are not adequate to pay all future pensions. The amount of this liability in MOFD is reported at $70 million. The reasons for this are complex, with no easy fix. I will continue to aggressively fund this obligation.
In five years, pension debt has been lowered by $12 million and funds to a benefits trust are on schedule. By 2022, a $28 million pension bond will be funded. As director, I will continue to aggressively pay down debt.
With pride and professionalism, the MOFD will provide the highest level of emergency and public service in response to the needs of our community — this is our mission.  Some believe unfunded liability is the most important issue. When you call 911 and are having the worst day of your life, MOFD is there – I
understand.

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